Occupational Medicine
Dr Michael Givens DC, CME          Call Now  573-651-8686
Dr. Michael Givens DC,CME | 2917 Independence | Ste 400 | Cape Girardeau MO | 63703 | 573-651-8686 

News

Parental Testing from

Wikipedia

Parental testing is the use of genetic fingerprinting to determine whether two individuals have a biological parent–child relationship. A paternity test establishes genetic proof whether a man is the biological father of an individual, and a maternity test establishes whether a woman is the biological mother of an individual. Though genetic testing is the most reliable standard, older methods also exist, including ABO blood group typing, analysis of various other proteins and enzymes, or using human leukocyte antigen antigens. The current techniques for paternal testing are using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Paternity testing can now also be performed while the woman is still pregnant from a blood draw. "A Noninvasive Test to Determine Paternity in Pregnancy" New England Journal of Medicine May 3, 2012[1][2] DNA testing is currently the most advanced and accurate technology to determine parentage. In a DNA parentage test, the result (called the 'probability of parentage)[3][not in citation given] is 0% when the alleged parent is not biologically related to the child and the probability of parentage is typically 99.99% when the alleged parent is biologically related to the child. However, while almost all individuals have a single and distinct set of genes, rare individuals, known as "chimeras", have at least two different sets of genes, which can result in a false negative result if their reproductive tissue has a different genetic makeup from the tissue sampled for the test.[4]  Read More Here

Federal grant will fund

sewage testing to track

state’s pot usage

SEATTLE – The federal government is chipping in money for a three-year pilot study using sewage samples to determine levels of marijuana use in two Washington cities – research that could help answer some key questions about pot legalization, the University of Puget Sound announced Monday. The National Institutes of Health has agreed to pay $120,000 so Dan Burgard, an associate chemistry professor, can conduct a three-year study that will look at how per-capita pot use changed after Washington’s first legal pot shops opened in July. The research, based on methods first developed by scientists in Italy in 2005, involves analyzing wastewater samples for levels of metabolites produced when the body processes drugs. Read more here

DNA Paternity Test Proves

Fatherhood

Every child has just one biological father. But sometimes you need a paternity test to identify the real father. And certain legal situations involving custody and child support require PROOF of fatherhood. Later in life, an adult may become curious about his biological roots and need to verify his birth father. That's what happened to me. And that's how I got interested in DNA testing.   Read More Here

The Commercial Motor Vehicle

Driver Medical Examination:

Practical Issues

NATALIE P. HARTENBAUM, MD, MPH, OccuMedix, Inc., Dresher, Pennsylvania Am Fam Physician. 2010 Apr 15;81(8):975- 980. The online version of this article includes supplemental content. The commercial motor vehicle driver medical examination aims to ensure that commercial drivers can safely perform all driving and nondriving work-related tasks. In conducting the examination and completing the related certification, the medical examiner must follow mandated medical standards and consider medical advisory criteria. Examiners should consider the substantial expert guidance provided in making certification determinations. For several common conditions, regulations and guidance are currently under review by medical review boards and expert panels, and major updates are likely in the near future. In addition, legislative changes are likely to require specific training and certification for medical examiners. These changes aim to increase the effectiveness of the commercial motor vehicle driver medical examination as a public health safeguard by reducing commercial motor vehicle crashes. Most commercial motor vehicle drivers are required to meet the medical standards of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA); nevertheless, medical conditions of drivers continue to be implicated in crashes involving commercial motor vehicles.1,2 One strategy to improve safety is better training of the commercial motor vehicle driver medical examiner.2,3 Recent rulemaking may restrict medical examiner eligibility in the future to those who complete specified training and certification.4 This article focuses on major changes in assessment of commercial motor vehicle drivers since the 1998 review published in American Family Physician (http://www.aafp.org/afp/980800ap/po mmer.html).5

Order Your Copy

          Kindle Edition  is $.99  

Key Clinical Recommendations

For Medical Certification

When performing a commercial motor vehicle driver medical examination, the examiner must consider the 13 federal medical standards, plus related recommendations and guidance, to reach a certification determination. Commercial motor vehicle drivers who take anti hypertensive agents should be medically re-certified annually, even if blood pressure readings are in the range of 140 mm Hg or less systolic and 90 mm Hg or less diastolic. Commercial motor vehicle drivers who require insulin, but are otherwise healthy, may qualify for a federal diabetes exemption to be certified.
Read More Here
Occupational Medicine
Dr Michael Givens DC, CME
Dr. Michael Givens | 2917 Independence | Suite 400 Cape Girardeau MO | 63703 | 573-651-8686

News

Parental Testing from Wikipedia

Parental testing is the use of genetic fingerprinting to determine whether two individuals have a biological parent–child relationship. A paternity test establishes genetic proof whether a man is the biological father of an individual, and a maternity test establishes whether a woman is the biological mother of an individual. Though genetic testing is the most reliable standard, older methods also exist, including ABO blood group typing, analysis of various other proteins and enzymes, or using human leukocyte antigen antigens. The current techniques for paternal testing are using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Paternity testing can now also be performed while the woman is still pregnant from a blood draw. "A Noninvasive Test to Determine Paternity in Pregnancy" New England Journal of Medicine May 3, 2012[1][2] DNA testing is currently the most advanced and accurate technology to determine parentage. In a DNA parentage test, the result (called the 'probability of parentage)[3][not in citation given] is 0% when the alleged parent is not biologically related to the child and the probability of parentage is typically 99.99% when the alleged parent is biologically related to the child. However, while almost all individuals have a single and distinct set of genes, rare individuals, known as "chimeras", have at least two different sets of genes, which can result in a false negative result if their reproductive tissue has a different genetic makeup from the tissue sampled for the test.[4]  Read More Here

Federal grant will fund

sewage testing to track

state’s pot usage

SEATTLE – The federal government is chipping in money for a three-year pilot study using sewage samples to determine levels of marijuana use in two Washington cities – research that could help answer some key questions about pot legalization, the University of Puget Sound announced Monday. The National Institutes of Health has agreed to pay $120,000 so Dan Burgard, an associate chemistry professor, can conduct a three-year study that will look at how per-capita pot use changed after Washington’s first legal pot shops opened in July. The research, based on methods first developed by scientists in Italy in 2005, involves analyzing wastewater samples for levels of metabolites produced when the body processes drugs. Read more here

DNA Paternity Test Proves

Fatherhood

Every child has just one biological father. But sometimes you need a paternity test to identify the real father. And certain legal situations involving custody and child support require PROOF of fatherhood. Later in life, an adult may become curious about his biological roots and need to verify his birth father. That's what happened to me. And that's how I got interested in DNA testing.   Read More Here

The Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Medical

Examination: Practical Issues

NATALIE P. HARTENBAUM, MD, MPH, OccuMedix, Inc., Dresher, Pennsylvania Am Fam Physician. 2010 Apr 15;81(8):975-980. The online version of this article includes supplemental content. The commercial motor vehicle driver medical examination aims to ensure that commercial drivers can safely perform all driving and nondriving work-related tasks. In conducting the examination and completing the related certification, the medical examiner must follow mandated medical standards and consider medical advisory criteria. Examiners should consider the substantial expert guidance provided in making certification determinations. For several common conditions, regulations and guidance are currently under review by medical review boards and expert panels, and major updates are likely in the near future. In addition, legislative changes are likely to require specific training and certification for medical examiners. These changes aim to increase the effectiveness of the commercial motor vehicle driver medical examination as a public health safeguard by reducing commercial motor vehicle crashes. Most commercial motor vehicle drivers are required to meet the medical standards of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA); nevertheless, medical conditions of drivers continue to be implicated in crashes involving commercial motor vehicles.1,2 One strategy to improve safety is better training of the commercial motor vehicle driver medical examiner.2,3 Recent rulemaking may restrict medical examiner eligibility in the future to those who complete specified training and certification.4 This article focuses on major changes in assessment of commercial motor vehicle drivers since the 1998 review published in American Family Physician (http://www.aafp.org/afp/980800ap/pommer.html).5

Order Your Copy

          Kindle Edition  is $.99  

Key Clinical Recommendations

For Medical Certification

When performing a commercial motor vehicle driver medical examination, the examiner must consider the 13 federal medical standards, plus related recommendations and guidance, to reach a certification determination. Commercial motor vehicle drivers who take anti hypertensive agents should be medically re-certified annually, even if blood pressure readings are in the range of 140 mm Hg or less systolic and 90 mm Hg or less diastolic. Commercial motor vehicle drivers who require insulin, but are otherwise healthy, may qualify for a federal diabetes exemption to be certified.
Read More Here